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PHILOSOPHY
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PHIL 1 Introduction to Philosophy

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Advisory: Eligible for English 1A.

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: C2; IGETC: 3B; GAV-GE: C2; CAN: PHIL 2

Philosophy 1 is intended as a survey of the major areas and traditions of philosophy. The course examines central and significant questions about the meaning of life, who determines what is morally right or wrong, the ideal society, the various notions social justice, what is reality, and many other ideas. In pursuing these questions, students will be asked to read texts from writers around the world, both contemporary and ancient, discuss current events, and apply 'theory' to movies such as "The Matrix" trilogy, novels, and any other relevant application of the student's own choice.


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PHIL 2 Logic

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Advisory: Eligible for English 1A.

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: A3; GAV-GE: C2; CAN: PHIL 6

Philosophy 2 is intended as a survey of the primary approaches to argumentation and what has been traditionally called 'correct' reasoning. Students will learn techniques of both deductive and inductive argumentation, basic symbolic logic, how to spot a fallacy, as well as how to apply these techniques to other aspects of their lives outside of the classroom. While logic is often quite formal, the goal is to see the practical application of this discipline. Students will become acquainted with the cultural variations to reasoning in addition to the standard Western focal approach.


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PHIL 3 Ethics

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Advisory: Eligible for English 1A.

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: C2; IGETC: 3B; GAV-GE: C2; CAN: PHIL 4

Philosophy 3 is intended as a survey of the major areas and traditions of ethical and moral theories. The course examines central and significant questions about who determines what is morally right or wrong, the ideal society, the various notions social justice, moral agency and action in our lives and community, as well as many other topics. In pursuing these questions, students will be asked to read texts from writers around the world, both contemporary and ancient, discuss current events, and apply 'theory' to movies , novels, and any other relevant application of the student's own choice.


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PHIL 3B Contemporary Moral Issues

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Advisory: Eligible for English 1A.

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: C2; IGETC: 3B; GAV-GE: C2, E2

Contemporary Moral Issues in an applied ethics class that covers major ethical theories and contemporary moral issues in a pluralistic manner. This course will cover such issues as abortion and euthanasia, cloning, experimentation on human subjects, capital punishment, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation and sexual morality, world hunger and poverty, colonialism and post-colonialism, and so forth.


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PHIL 4 Critical Thinking and Writing

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Prerequisite: English 1A

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: A3; IGETC: 1B; GAV-GE: C2

This course is designed to introduce the relationship between critical thinking and critical writing in a way that will be both enjoyable to the student and helpful in other aspects of life. The student will learn techniques of critical thinking, playing close attention to the current events, movies and popular media, music lyrics, as well as the textbook. Students will learn to identify deductive and inductive arguments and be able to evaluate their strength, create a strong argument of their own on a given topic, as well become experts in the area of critical analysis. The goal is to enable students to become strong, well informed, articulate members of the community as well as individuals with an empowered sense of self as an agent of change.


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PHIL 5 Critical Thinking

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Advisory: Eligible for English 1A.

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: A3; GAV-GE: C2

Critical thinking is a theoretical study and practical application of logical argumentation; uncritical and critical thinking; the dialogical dialectic; the encoder-decoder process; communication symbolism and intensities; critical thinking qualities and strategies; language, acceptability, sufficiency, and relevancy fallacies; extended arguments; and critical thinking applied to advertising and the mass media. Assignments include at least five separate written discourses totaling more than six thousand words and four major exams; both objective and subjective questions.


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PHIL 6 Religions of the World

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Advisory: Eligible for English 1A.

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: C2; IGETC: 3B; GAV-GE: C2, F

Religion is a topic that ignites controversy - most societies engage in religious practices, believe strongly in that tradition, and find a sense of identity within it. The controversy arises when differences are misunderstood, misrepresented, or placed in a hierarchy of assumed supremacy of one religion as superior to others. In this class, students explore the underlying commonality of various religious traditions, explore the uniqueness of the religions with which they are unfamiliar, and learn to see that diversity among beliefs doesn't have to create hostility. Students will explore religions from Indigenous Peoples throughout the world, East Asia (e.g. India), China, the Middle East, as well as some more recent trends in religion.


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PHIL 6B Philosophy of Religion

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Advisory: Eligible for English 1A.

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: C2; IGETC: 3B; GAV-GE: C2, E2

A reflective examination and analysis of the meanings and beliefs involved in religion and the religious experience. Introductory study of such topics as the nature and grounds of religious belief, relation between religion and ethics, nature and existence of god, problem of evil, and what can be learned from the religious experience. Additionally, the student will discuss the impact of religion on society, social norms, and the political impact of religion.


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PHIL 7A History of Philosophy: Ancient to Medieval Times

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Advisory: Eligible for English 1A.

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: C2; IGETC: 3B; GAV-GE: C2

Philosophy 7A is a survey of the history of philosophy from the ancient to the medieval periods. It is a great class to take along with World History or a literature course.


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PHIL 7B History of Philosophy: Renaissance to Modern Periods

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Advisory: Eligible for English 1A.

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: C2; IGETC: 3B; GAV-GE: C2

Philosophy 7B is a survey of the history of philosophy from the Renaissance to the modern periods. It is a great class to take along with World History or a literature course


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PHIL 8 Introduction to the Philosophy of Science

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Advisory: Eligible for English 1A

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: C2; IGETC: 3B; GAV-GE: C2, E2

The introduction to the Philosophy of Science is an investigation into the aims, methods, and world view of science and technology. Students will study selected problems concerning the character and reliability of scientific understanding, such as the nature of scientific theory and explanation, reality of theoretical entities, inductive confirmation of hypotheses, and occurrence of scientific revolutions. Discussion will be at the non-technical level of episodes from the history of science.


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PHIL 12 Introduction to Political Thought

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: D8; IGETC: 4H; GAV-GE: D2

This course provides students with an introduction to and grounding in classical and modern political thought. Students will be introduced to theorists such as Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, and Marx. Students will also examine such timeless questions as: "What is justice?" "What is the good life?" and "What is power?" among others. This course is also listed as POLS 12. Previously POLS 2.


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PHIL 15 Asian Philosophies

Units: 3     Hours: 3 Lecture

Advisory: Eligible for English 1A.

Transferable: CSU; UC; CSU-GE: C2; IGETC: 3B; GAV-GE: C2, E2

This course is designed to introduce the student to the minor Asian philosophical traditions. This will consist of reviewing major East, South East, and South Asian philosophical traditions (e.g. Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism) and the non-Western approach to epistemology, ethics, metaphysics, and logic. We shall attempt to evaluate, examine, and compare many important theoretical principles and the ways they have influenced each other as well as Asian and Asian-American cultures and societies.