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STANDARD IV: Leadership and Governance



The institution recognizes and utilizes the contributions of leadership throughout the organization for continuous improvement of the institution. Governance roles are designed to facilitate decisions that support student learning programs and services and improve institutional effectiveness, while acknowledging the designated responsibilities of the governing Board and the chief administrator.




A. DECISION-MAKING ROLES AND PROCESSES

The institute recognizes that the ethical and effective leadership throughout the organization enables the institution to identify institutional values, set and achieve goals, learn and improve.


  1. Institutional leaders create an environment for empowerment, innovation, and institutional excellence. They encourage staff, faculty, administrators, and students, no matter what their official titles, to take initiative in improving the practices, programs, and services in which they are involved. When ideas for improvement have policy or significant institution-wide implications, systematic participative processes are used to assure effective discussion, planning, and implementation.

DESCRIPTION:

The college has clearly defined its purposes, values, intended student learning community, and its commitment to ensure student success through its mission statement. Last updated by the Board of Trustees in January 2006, the mission states:

"In an environment that nurtures creativity and intellectual curiosity, Gavilan College serves the community by providing a high-quality learning experience which prepares students for transfer, technical and public service careers, lifelong learning, and participation in a diverse global society" (4.1).

The mission statement is widely distributed throughout the campus in the catalog, strategic plan, and marketing material that is distributed to students and the general public. In response to question 12 of the accreditation survey, 74 percent of faculty, staff, and administrators responded that they somewhat (35 percent) or strongly (39 percent) agreed that the Mission Statement is clear and well publicized. Fifteen percent remained neutral on the question, while 9 percent disagree somewhat and 2 percent strongly disagreed (4.2).

The college has made a concerted effort to publish its goals and values in various locations. The current college catalog contains information including the philosophy statement, mission statement, and statement of educational purposes and goals; it also includes descriptions of degree programs, curricular offerings, educational resources, and course offerings. The Strategic Plan outlines the college's mission, vision, values, and learning outcomes. Additional publications include specific programs' and services' pamphlets and brochures, news releases, and the college website.

In response to data that demonstrated that the college was losing as much as one-third of its student base to surrounding colleges, a College of Choice Task Force was formed. The task force identified several initiatives that have been implemented including the transition to a 16-week compressed calendar, a two-year process which began in fall 2004 and was implemented in fall 2006, and a Five-Year Full-Time Faculty Hiring Plan (4.3).

The college expanded offerings in athletics through the hiring of more full-time faculty who will serve as coaches. In addition, a full-time tenure-tracked music instructor was hired to develop music programs that will encourage academic and community participation for music in general. Full-time faculty have also been hired in theater, psychology, biology, and English as a second language.

A significant accomplishment and acknowledgement of support from the community was the passage of a $108 million dollar facilities improvement bond in March 2004. The funds from this bond measure are allowing the college to renovate outdated facilities in a manner that will provide students with a learning environment that meets current comfort, safety, and technology expectations.

The college promotes staff participation in planning and operational decision-making processes. As part of this effort, students, faculty, and professional support staff have worked to develop institutional learning outcomes; from which program learning outcomes and unit plans are derived. The college has published and promoted staff responsibilities related to the achievement of college goals.

A Strategic Planning Subcommittee of President's Council meets on a quarterly basis to develop strategies and establish goals for the college. The process is structured as a collaborative effort with the goal of having an informed body of participants. Planning strategies and associated goals are approved annually for a five year period. The Strategic Plan is used to drive budget allocations and is published in the college's annual budget (4.4).

The institution has a vision statement that demonstrates historical knowledge of the community it serves; it outlines the college's values, and provides benchmarks to help it judge how well it is meeting its stated goals (4.5, p. 1-3).

The Associated Student Body's (ASB's) stated goal on the college website, states:

"The Associated Student Body (ASB) of Gavilan College is dedicated to the representation of the Gavilan student body. The ASB is committed to providing services and activities that meet the educational, cultural and social needs of the Gavilan College student body."

"The collective voice of the students is an important and powerful component in the college's participatory governance process. The ASB is the official student organization on campus and provides the majority of student input and recommendations on critical campus issues. ASB meetings are held in the north lounge every Tuesday at 8:10 a.m." (4.6).

The college's Stand Together Group's membership has included all categories of the college community including students, classified staff, faculty, and management. The mission states:

"The Stand Together Group exists to promote and celebrate diversity, inclusiveness, and mutual respect in our campus community, so everyone at Gavilan College feels safe, respected, and included." (4.7)

The college tracks a variety of data to measure institutional outcomes. A comprehensive list of institutional research projects is listed on the research office webpage  (4.8). Examples include assessment validation, College Test for English Placement (CTEP) for reading; enrollment projections; learning community evaluation; prerequisite research for English; student and employee satisfaction surveys and analysis; assessment validation using Gavilan English as Second Language (GESL) test; and program graduation rates, retention, success and persistence data.

Participatory committees are the primary vehicles for institutional governance. The principal components of this structure are the following committees: President's Council, Academic Senate, Curriculum, Staff Development, Professional Support Staff, Budget, Institutional Effectiveness, District Technology, and Health, Safety, Facilities, and Grounds Committees. The management team (administrators, supervisors), faculty, professional support staff, and students are members as well as resources for the committees.

For Academic Senate committees, the administration is invited to participate while faculty has the lead role. Ad hoc college committees are created as needed to study and recommend actions on pressing college issues. Appointments to ad hoc committees are made through established management, professional support staff, faculty, and student governance committees. A list of committees, by-laws, meeting times, agendas, and minutes is available on the college intranet (4.9).

The Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) reviews all programs and services on a rotational basis. The role of the committee is to facilitate and standardize the program review processes required by Accreditation Standards, the Educational Code of California, Title 5 regulations, and Board policies. Membership includes representation from faculty, professional support staff, and administration. The IEC advises President's Council concerning program review and oversees the review process to maintain consistency in the development, selection, and application of criteria and guidelines. Additional information about the operations of the IEC is included in Standard IIA of this self-study report. Board Policy 4020 and Administrative Procedure 4020 establish the policy and procedures that are followed in program and curriculum development and review (4.10).

The Academic Senate serves as the primary body addressing faculty participation in governance and evaluation of instruction. The Academic Senate has biweekly meetings with agendas and minutes published on the college intranet (4.11). Its subcommittees include the Curriculum Committee that reviews course outlines, course and student learning outcomes, and approves new courses; the Faculty Staff Development Committee that reviews and approves flex contracts, and recommends staff development activities; and the Institutional Effectiveness Committee that reviews all programs and services on a rotating basis.

The institution defines and publishes its planning processes and involves appropriate segments of the college community in the development of institutional plans. Board Policy 3250 and Administrative Procedure 3250 define the general parameters for planning processes (4.12). The President's Council has a Strategic Planning Subcommittee that meets on a quarterly basis. This is a formal planning group that was established to raise awareness about planning and to encourage participation in the planning processes (4.4).

EVALUATION:

Other than two exceptions over the past six years, the college meets this standard. The college uses institutional research to evaluate performance in achieving desired objectives as stated in the mission. A wide range of research reports are available on the college's web site.

Of special note is an enrollment analysis study conducted in preparation for a land acquisition search. The enrollment analysis revealed that one-third of the community college students who reside within the college's service area attend community colleges other than Gavilan. This unusually high number of students leaving the Gavilan service area to obtain college courses became the basis for the State Chancellor's Office assistance with a more detailed enrollment analysis that tracked students from Gavilan's area to the surrounding colleges. The assessment revealed that students were pursuing many of the same programs offered at Gavilan, that is, transferable courses that meet the general education requirements.

The research data showed that the college had to make some changes to attract more of its resident population. A College of Choice Task Force was formed to develop initiatives to reduce the free-flow of students out of the district.

All college employees were offered the opportunity to participate on the task force or to submit ideas and comments to the committee members for consideration. Through a collaborative process the task force recommended three significant changes. First, follow through on the work that had already been done to convert to a shorter 16-week calendar. Second, develop a plan to increase the number of full-time faculty and third, increase marketing and advertising efforts. Each of the recommendations was accepted by the college community and has been implemented.

These changes at Gavilan are all the result of use of data that showed the college was not reaching many of its potential student customers. The data used to support the changes were widely distributed across campus. Changes were brought forward to the Board of Trustees for approval only after a thorough analysis and dialogue occurred within the college community.

The college governance structure provides a clearly defined and substantive role in institutional governance. The faculty, through the Academic Senate, is able to participate in all appropriate areas of institutional governance. The Academic Senate appoints the chairs of the Curriculum and Staff Development Committees, and appoints faculty to all screening, tenure review, and ad hoc institutional committees. The Academic Senate's president and immediate past president (or the current vice president) serve on the President's Council. The Senate President sits as a non-voting member with the Board of Trustees.

While the structure provides a clearly defined role, the faculty differ in their perceptions of how substantive that role is. Question F2, section six, item one of the accreditation survey, states: "Faculty has significant influence on decisions made by senior administrators". The response to this question shows that 37 percent of the faculty either somewhat or strong disagree with it, 40 percent either somewhat or strongly agree with it, and 17 percent were neutral. However, when assessing the broader college community that includes faculty, staff, and administration, the survey results show that only 19 percent of the respondents disagreed with the statement that "Decisions at this college are made using the principles of participatory governance". (4.2A, Section 2, question 70).

There have been a number of large initiatives that were discussed at length using the full range of governance committees. Among these are block-scheduling, which was implemented in fall of 2005; the Five-Year Full-Time Faculty Hiring Plan, and the movement from an 18-week to a 16-week semester, implemented in fall of 2006. The original dialogue for the 16-week calendar was initiated by the faculty; the action plan for implementing the calendar has been spearheaded by the current administration, and has included ongoing and vigorous discussion by a wide range of college constituent groups.

There have also been some major changes that were initiated without extensive campus discussions. Among these were the decision to create a full-time administrative position for the athletic director in 2001, the decision to begin a noncredit program in 2004, and the decision to hire a full-time music instructor in 2005. The athletic director and the music instructor were hired on the initiative of the Board of Trustees. There was no input requested from the college community as a whole.

The full-time administrator athletic director's hiring occurred at a Board of Trustees meeting where the college president brought a recommendation from the President's Council to establish a faculty position that was 60 percent athletic director and 40 percent teaching. During the meeting, a Board subcommittee reported out, for the first time, a recommendation to hire a full-time administrator to serve as athletics director. The Board immediately voted, unanimously, to create the full-time administrator position (4.13, 4.14).

The establishment of a noncredit program was initiated by the president at a time of stagnant enrollment in the credit program, and when $400,000 was available in growth funds from the state. The college had been receiving feedback that some community members desired classes specifically targeted to the interests and needs of older adults. The president reassigned an administrator, who was already working to develop community programs, to devote part of her time towards developing noncredit instruction for the community. To increase understanding of the program, and allay fears of competition with credit courses, the administrator of the noncredit program arranged for an open forum discussion with a panel of experts from the Chancellor's Office. Program leads from the noncredit division of San Francisco City College, one of the largest noncredit programs in the state, participated as well. The forum gave all concerned the opportunity to have questions answered regarding the impact of noncredit instruction.

The program was presented to the Board of Trustees for information and approval over the course of a month, however the request for input from faculty provided only a few days for faculty review and comment. With such a short time frame, there was no opportunity for department meetings, Academic Senate discussion, or any other shared governance feedback (4.15). All matters related to course offerings and curriculum since then have followed the collegial process. The noncredit courses that are now offered were approved through the participatory governance process by the Curriculum Committee.

A number of faculty members have expressed their concerns that while these initiatives may be good for the college and the community, they may not have been completely thought through and clearly sidestepped the college's participatory planning process. In the past year, the president recognized tension in the college environment and invited staff and faculty from all departments to meet with him to discuss ways to improve the collegial atmosphere. All but one department, including the satellite campuses, met with the president. A solid structure for shared governance exists, and providing for the expression of differing perspectives remains a priority in building confidence in the shared governance process.

The institution clearly states and publicizes the role of staff in institutional governance. At one time, classified staff had a participatory structure called Classified Council. It consisted of all classified staff, including confidential and supervisory employees. The Classified Council became inactive due to lack of volunteers. In fall 2000 a new classified leadership emerged, called the Professional Support Staff. This body remains the classified staff's representatives in participatory governance. Appointments to the President's Council are made by the Professional Support Staff's union president.

The institution clearly states and publicizes the role of students in institutional governance. Statements regarding the students' rights and roles in the shared governance process are included in the college catalog, the Student Handbook (to be replaced with a handbook of Policies and Procedures), the Gavilan College webpage, the Board of Trustees' policy, and the Associated Student Body (ASB) Senate Handbook. The bylaws of standing campus committees (e.g., Curriculum Committee, College Council, and Faculty Senate) clearly identify the role of students in the shared governance process. Shared governance is included in the course outline for the Contemporary Leadership class, and campus orientations include an overview of student participation in the ASB. Student representatives are also invited to participate in all staff screening and hiring committees, as well as numerous other campus committees. The ASB President announces committee opportunities and solicits volunteers at ASB meetings.

The participatory governance structure is in place and works for all routine and the majority of non-routine issues. On occasion, the president and the elected Board of Trustees have made decisions without agreement from all college constituencies. In some cases this has led to resentment on the part of individuals or groups.

PLAN:

None


  1. The institution establishes and implements a written policy providing for faculty, staff, administrator, and student participation in decision-making processes. The policy specifies the manner in which individuals bring forward ideas from their constituencies and work together on appropriate policy, planning, and special-purpose bodies.
  1. Faculty and administrators have a substantive and clearly defined role in institutional governance and exercise a substantial voice in institutional policies, planning, and budget that relate to their areas of responsibility and expertise. Students and staff also have established mechanisms or organizations for providing input into institutional decisions.

DESCRIPTION:

Board Policy 3250 and Administrative Procedure 3250 clearly define the planning processes at Gavilan College (4.12). The major committees that provide a forum for dialogue and ensure access to a participatory governance structure are President's Council, the Academic Senate, the Health, Safety, Facilities, and Grounds Committee, the Budget Committee, the District Technology Committee, Institutional Effectiveness Committee, and the Strategic Planning Committee. Department Chairs also are involved in operational matters and provide input to the vice president of instruction.

The President's Council is established under the authority of Board Policy 2510 and Administrative Procedure 2510 (4.16). It is a shared governance body made up of all constituency groups of the college. The President's Council makes recommendations to the president in a variety of areas for the campus. Minutes of the President's Council meetings are posted on the President's Council section of the website (4.17).

The Academic Senate is involved in planning and decision making for a variety of areas. The Academic Senate meets every two weeks to discuss matters that are within AB 1725. The Academic Senate website includes the bylaws, as well as past meeting minutes and agendas (4.11). The role of the faculty in governance is described in the Faculty Handbook, the bylaws of the Curriculum Committee, and Board policy. Faculty is also encouraged to be involved in any operational matter that is being discussed on campus.

The College Budget Committee is comprised of representatives from administration, faculty, professional support staff, and students. The Budget Committee bylaws and minutes are posted online (4.18). The College Budget Committee is the primary vehicle for distribution of information about financial allocations and significant events that impact the college's budget. The committee meets on a regular basis over the course of the year and more frequently as the college enters into the development of the tentative and final budgets.

In addition to the college's internal Budget Committee, there is also a Board of Trustees Budget Subcommittee. Information is provided to the college's internal Budget Committee prior to submitting the information to the Board subcommittee.

The Strategic Planning Committee includes representatives from all groups on campus: administration, faculty, professional support staff, and students. The bylaws and minutes from the meetings are posted on the college intranet. The bylaws identify the membership of the committee and describe the responsibilities of the committee. The Strategic Plan is used to develop budget guidelines to ensure that the Strategic Plan objectives are considered for funding allocations as the budget is being developed.

Faculty department chairs meet with the vice president of instruction twice a month to discuss operational matters and to provide input on proposed initiatives and changes. The Department Chairs receive much of the same information that is shared with the President's Council but the Department Chairs meeting is not part of the institutional shared governance process. Department Chairs have operational responsibilities related to the assignment of teaching faculty, establishment of the college schedule of classes, and other matters related to instructional activities.

The District Technology Committee recommends minimum technology standards for classroom instruction and for the use of technology across the college, including the administrative technology system. The Technology Committee is also responsible for development of the college's Technology Plan. The website for the Technology Committee where the bylaws, the Technology Plan, and meeting minutes are posted online (4.19). The Technology Plan is considered in the development of the Strategic Plan. The Technology Plan is used to guide the facilities renovation work that is under way and is also used to determine the priorities for funding other technology changes for the new Enterprise Resource Program.

The Health, Safety, Facilities, and Grounds Committee is charged with making a variety of recommendations about health and safety concerns as well as recommendations about facilities improvements. Information is online (4.20). Committee bylaws, minutes of the meetings and information related to facilities renovation work is available from this website. The Facilities Master Plan which is in part under the purview of the Health, Safety, Facilities, and Grounds Committee is used to establish the funding allocations for facility renovation projects and incorporated into the budget process.

The Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) reviews all programs on campus. Board Policy 4020 and Administrative Procedure 4020 identify the responsibilities of the IEC. The IEC website includes information on the mission, members, guidelines, and meeting minutes (4.21).

EVALUATION:

The role of each constituency group on campus is defined for each committee that has been established. When proposed changes have a broad impact on the college, most of the time faculty, professional support staff, and students are encouraged to become involved in task forces, forums, or other sessions designed to solicit input for the purpose of enriching the dialogue. Participation on committees is active and a number of different personnel are engaged in the activities of the committees.

Two notable exceptions to this process were the hiring by the Board of a full-time athletic director at a time when budgets were being cut and the implementation of the noncredit program with only minimal feedback from the college community (4.13, 4.14).

Not all employees understand the process for prioritization of items in the budget. There is an overall plan that ties the Strategic Plan priorities and the budget together (4.22, 3/21/06, Item 7.5). While some indicate that they are unsure of how the process works, Board Policy 3250 and Administrative Procedure 3250 (4.12) provide a clear description of how these processes relate to one another. The college uses the final budget to demonstrate how resources are allocated to achieve goals identified in the Strategic Plan.

This continues to be an underlying concern among some of the employees who are not familiar with current practices. From an institutional perspective it may be possible to further educate all employees on the planning and budgeting process.

PLAN:

  • Develop a communications plan to educate all employees on the planning and budgeting process.

  1. The institution relies on faculty, its academic senate or other appropriate faculty structures, the Curriculum Committee, and academic administrators for recommendations about student learning programs and services.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan relies primarily on the faculty and the Academic Senate for academic and professional matters. Faculty provide leadership for changes that may be needed to ensure that curriculum and programs meet the needs of students. Administration identifies areas where the communities served by Gavilan College are in need of services that are expected to be provided by a community college. Faculty members develop curriculum, programs, and establish learning outcomes for all educational programs offered at the college. The documents that identify the importance of faculty in development of educational offerings of the college are listed below and all are available online:

  • The Academic Senate bylaws (4.11)
  • The Curriculum bylaws (4.23)
  • The Faculty Staff Development Committee documents (4.24)
  • The Gavilan College Faculty Association Contract (4.25)
  • The Faculty Handbook (4.26)

These documents establish the foundation from which the faculty can participate in every major discussion and decision related to the student learning programs and services offered by the college.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. The official responsibilities of the faculty and of academic administrators in the development and approval of curriculum and other educational matters are well established in the policies, procedures, and other authoritative documents that establish standard operating procedures at the college. Except for the noncredit program cited in standards IV A 1 and 2a above, the documents are followed in practice and serve as the primary source of guidance as matters related to student learning programs and services are discussed.

PLAN:

None


  1. Through established governance structures, processes, and practices, the governing Board, administrators, faculty, staff, and students work together for the good of the institution. These processes facilitate discussion of ideas and effective communication among the institution's constituencies.

DESCRIPTION:

The participatory governance process of Gavilan College is grounded in Assembly Bill 1725 and is incorporated into Board Policy 3250 and Administrative Procedure 3250 (4.12). The college uses the President's Council as the primary structure for input and participation by constituency groups. Individuals and representatives of the constituency groups can bring items forward for discussion at President's Council. The administration also brings items to President's Council and the Academic Senate for discussion and input.

The President's Council consists of at least one representative from Academic Senate, professional support staff, managers/supervisors/confidentials, and the Associated Student Body. The superintendent/president chairs the President's Council. The vice president of instruction, the vice president of student services, and the vice president of administrative services are resources to President's Council and participate as non-voting members. President's Council makes recommendations to the superintendent/president on matters affecting the college.

As part of the accreditation self study, a survey was disseminated throughout the campus (4.2). The results indicate the following:

#20:  Addresses effective participation in planning, evaluation, and research at the college: 36 percent of participants somewhat agree; 32 percent of participants strongly agree.

#65:  Addresses strength of professional support staff voice in personnel selection: 28 percent somewhat agree; 21 percent strongly agree; 18 percent N/A; 19 percent neutral.

#66:  Addresses positive interaction with other groups of college employees:  27 percent somewhat; 44 percent strongly agree.

#70:  Address effective voice in participatory governance:  21 percent neutral; 29 percent somewhat agree; 23 percent strongly agree.

As noted earlier in this section of the self study, there are a number of subcommittees of the President's Council. Subcommittees generally review a topic prior to when it's being discussed before the full President's Council. Because of all of the various subcommittees of the President's Council there are a large number of employees who participate in the collaborative decision-making process. Participation by faculty, staff, and students is very high and as a result, many different perspectives are considered before final actions are sent to the Board of Trustees for action. It is not uncommon to find positive and negative comments obtained during the participatory governance process to be included in the Board agenda item as it is presented to the Board of Trustees for consideration.

The Academic Senate also receives reports and makes recommendations on significant matters of interest to the college. The Academic Senate has some standing committees and also creates ad hoc committees when necessary to discuss particular topics of importance to the college.

Communication of information is disseminated across the college in regular newsletters. The superintendent/president sends emails when there are extraordinary newsworthy events occurring that are of importance to the college community. On occasion, the superintendent/president will meet with all employees to discuss important changes that are affecting the college.

The college submitted its first community report regarding the college's overall activities during 2005. A second report prepared by the Citizen's Oversight Committee was sent out in early 2006 to update the community about the facilities improvement expenditures made from the Measure E facilities improvement bond. Both of the reports will be issued annually.

EVALUATION:

Even though there are regular opportunities for dialogue and participation in decision-making processes, there are times when some employees feel that the dialogue was insufficient or incomplete, or even question whether the dialogue has occurred. Minutes are available to validate the comments and concerns raised during the meetings. Most committees maintain up-to-date postings of agendas and minutes on the intranet. Sometimes, however, committee chairs neglect to keep their web pages updated. The Academic Senate, for example, neglected to post minutes for any of the meetings for spring 2006. A major concern is that voting representatives on faculty committees do not effectively communicate with their constituent groups prior to voting.

The college continues in its efforts to improve communication with all employees in a manner that is not only informative but is also effective in soliciting input and feedback. Communication with college staff is important in ensuring that the college's constituency groups are aware of the activities occurring on campus. Since the last accreditation, the college has instituted the President's Council, with representatives from administration, faculty, classified, and the student body to improve shared governance.

PLAN:

  • Employ the college's participatory process for all institution-wide decisions.

  1. The institution advocates and demonstrates honesty and integrity in its relationships with external agencies. It agrees to comply with Accrediting Commission standards, policies, and guidelines, and Commission requirements for public disclosure, self-study and other reports, team visits, and prior approval of substantive changes. The institution moves expeditiously to respond to recommendations made by the Commission.

DESCRIPTION:

The college has positively responded to all past accreditation recommendations and communications from the Accreditation Commission. The midterm review and all annual reports have been submitted in a timely manner. The college has responded to all communications from the Accreditation Commission. The following letters document the correspondence between the Accreditation Commission and the college:

  • April 11, 2003, Accrediting Commission (request for Midterm Report, third year cycle) (4.27)
  • June 30, 2003, Accrediting Commission accepted Progress Report (4.28)
  • January 7, 2004, Accrediting Commission accepted Midterm Report (4.29)
  • April 14 2005, Gavilan College submitted 03-04 Accreditation Annual Fiscal Report (4.30)
  • March 2006, Gavilan College submitted 05-06 Accreditation Annual Report (4.31)

The college submits timely and accurate reports as required such as the annual Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) report and the Title 5 grant from the United States Department of Education.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. Gavilan College has positively responded to all recommendations of the previous accreditation team report. All issues are considered resolved.

PLAN:

None


  1. The role of leadership and the institution's governance and decision-making structures and processes are regularly evaluated to assure their integrity and effectiveness. The institution widely communicates the results of these evaluations and uses them as the basis for improvement.

DESCRIPTION:

The college reevaluates its governance and decision-making structures as needed. The college has used the same decision-making process for a number of years and is in compliance with existing Board policies and administrative procedures. When there are questions about whether an item has gone through the governance process prior to being presented to the Board of Trustees for consideration, a review is conducted to determine what processes have been followed. If an item was not processed through the normal process, it is generally removed from the agenda for additional consideration by the college. An example of this is the campus discussion regarding the charging of student health fees to Board of Governor waiver-eligible students.

The President's Council has representatives from all constituents on campus. This group makes recommendations to the president on current initiatives. Most significant college-wide decisions are made with this body's consent. The Academic Senate is the main venue where faculty voice concerns about governance, decision-making, and academic issues. Extensive dialogues also occur at the department chair level.

President's Council, Academic Senate, and Department Chair meeting minutes are all communicated and distributed. The president communicates through updates and monthly reports to the college. Ad hoc committees such as College of Choice and Expenditure Reduction Task Force make recommendations that are implemented through the system.

EVALUATION:

With only a couple of exceptions, the college responds and changes course when it appears that a recommendation has not been properly routed through the governance bodies. The college does not have a routine evaluation method or cycle established to consider the effectiveness of the governance model.

PLAN:

  • On an annual basis, the college should reaffirm its shared decision making model and identify any changes that may be appropriate to improve the effectiveness of the process.


B. BOARD AND ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION

In addition to the leadership of individuals and constituencies, institutions recognize the designated responsibilities of the governing Board for setting policies and of the chief administrator for the effective operation of the institution. Multi-college districts/systems clearly define the organizational roles of the district/system and the colleges.


  1. The institution has a governing Board that is responsible for establishing policies to assure the quality, integrity and effectiveness of the student learning programs and services and the financial stability of the institution. The governing Board adheres to a clearly defined policy for selecting and evaluating the chief administrator for the college or the district/system.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan College uses the policy update service available from the Community College League of California. This service provides regular updates to a comprehensive set of recommended policies. Using the college's shared governance process, the Board of Trustees evaluates each recommended policy change and adjusts policies to meet the specific needs of Gavilan College. The policies are updated on a regular basis although the updates themselves occur sporadically during the year. Many of the routine Board policy changes are the result of changes in state laws.

Board Policy 4020 – Program and Curriculum Development (4.10) sets a policy that the programs and curricula of the district shall be of high quality, relevant to community and student needs, and evaluated regularly to ensure quality and currency. Administrative Policy 4020 sets forth the processes and procedures that are used to ensure the intent of Board Policy 4020 is achieved.

In addition to the Board policies, the College's Educational Master Plan, and Strategic Plan reinforce the commitment to provide high quality educational programs. 

The Board of Trustees appointed Dr. Steven Kinsella Superintendent/President in January 2003 after conducting a nationwide search. The process used to select a new chief executive officer is identified in Board Policy 2431 (4.32). This process was used when Dr. Kinsella was hired. The hiring process was open and participatory and in accordance with policy under the direction of the Board of Trustees with assistance from a consulting firm. Board Policy 2431 (4.32) CEO Selection outlines the process that is followed when hiring a new CEO. The process was approved in October 2005 and closely matches the process that was used when Dr. Kinsella was hired.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. Board policies are updated on a regular basis and emphasize a need to maintain a high quality learning environment.  The policies also include fiscal policies that are reviewed annually as part of the final budget.

PLAN:

None


  1. The Governing Board is an independent policy-making body that reflects the public interest in Board activities and decisions. Once the Board reaches a decision, it acts as a whole. It advocates for and defends the institution and protects it from undue influence or pressure.

DESCRIPTION:

The Gavilan Joint Community College District serves the San Benito Joint Union High School District, Aromas-San Juan Unified, Gilroy Unified, and Morgan Hill Unified School Districts. The geographic area is southern Santa Clara County and most of San Benito County.

A seven-member Board of Trustees is elected at large from Morgan Hill, Gilroy, and San Benito County in even-numbered years. Board of Trustees' members serve staggered terms. Board Policy 2100 Board Elections identifies the number of seats assigned to each geographic area. The Board president, vice president, and clerk are elected in December at a yearly organizational meeting and serve a one-year term. They assume office in December of each year (4.33, Board Policy 2305) The Board also seats an elected student trustee, who has an advisory vote.

Designated members of the Faculty Senate and the professional support staff are encouraged to sit with the Board in an advisory capacity. Board Policy 2345 Public Participation at Board Meetings (4.34), provides an orderly process for public participation in Board of Trustees' public meetings and access to district records. The Board has delineated the protocols on the citizens' interim portion of the Board agenda. The college distributes information to the public regarding scheduled agenda items for each Board of Trustees meeting. The agendas for each meeting are posted at three campus locations, on the website, and distributed to local newspapers.

The Board ensures that public interest is reflected in its activities and decisions not only through its efforts to alert the public to items pending before it, but also by inviting the public to comment at its monthly meetings. The Board meets in closed sessions as provided by law to discuss the business of the district relating to legal and personnel issues and holds monthly meetings open to the public. On occasion, the Board holds announced special meetings and workshops.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. Board of Trustee policies provide a comprehensive set of guidelines that promote representation from the service area of the college, a free-flow information to the community served by the college and an opportunity for the public to provide direct input to members of the Board of Trustees. The webpage for Board members includes contact information (4.35). The Board of Trustees allows constituency groups to comment on significant issues presented for action to assist in ensuring the quality of the student learning programs.

PLAN:

None


  1. The Governing Board establishes policies consistent with the mission statement to ensure the quality, integrity, and improvement of student learning programs and services and the resources necessary to support them.

DESCRIPTION:

The m ission of the district was last reviewed and approved by the Board of Trustees on January 2006. Board Policy 1200 – District Mission identifies that the mission of the college is:

"In an environment that nurtures creativity and intellectual curiosity, Gavilan College serves the community by providing a high quality learning experience and preparing students for higher education, technical and public service careers, lifelong learning, and participation in a diverse global society." (4.1)

Chapter 4 of Board Policies lists a series of policies to promote the maintenance of high quality learning programs. Board Policy 4020 Program and Curriculum Development (4.10) sets the policy for educational programs. This policy requires the involvement of faculty and Academic Senate in all processes. Administrative Procedure 4020 establishes the implementation actions to assist in achieving the Board policy. Administrative Procedure 4020, among other things, requires that there be an Institutional Effectiveness Committee (IEC) and that a role of the IEC is to conduct program reviews on a regular basis. Program reviews help ensure the programs maintain a high quality of learning. 

In addition to Board policies, the college uses the Educational Master Plan and the Strategic Plan to ensure the high quality of the educational program. These plans provide information about the community served by the college that is used to identify changes in the environment so that services that may be needed can be appropriately incorporated into the direction of academics.

The Board delegates the authority to develop implementation strategies to the superintendent/president. The Board reviews the proposed budget for the district and assures that the final budget meets state requirements and Board adopted budget guidelines before final adoption.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard.

PLAN:

None


  1. The Governing Board has ultimate responsibility for educational quality, legal matters, and financial integrity.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan Joint Community College District is a political subdivision of the State of California. The members of the Board of Trustees are elected officials that act as an independent entity. The actions of the Board are final and not subject to action or review by another governmental entity. As a separate entity, the Board of Trustees is responsible for all legal matters and the financial operation of the district. As part of the California Community College system, the Board is responsible for ensuring that the operations of the district comply with directives and administrative regulations of the Board of Governors, California Community Colleges. Among the many responsibilities of the Governing Board is ensuring that the district is financially sound.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. The Board of Trustees is an independent body that has ultimate authority for educational quality, legal matters, and the financial integrity of the college.

PLAN:

None


  1. The institution or the Governing Board publishes the Board bylaws and policies specifying the Board's size, duties, responsibilities, structure, and operating procedures.

DESCRIPTION:

Board Policies 2010 (4.36) and 2100 (4.37) describe the eligibility for membership on the Board and the trustee areas for the seven Board members. Duties and responsibilities of the Board are described in Board Policy 2010. Duties of the officers of the Board are described in Board Policy 2210 (4.38).

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard.

PLAN:

None


  1. The Governing Board acts in a manner consistent with its policies and bylaws. The Board regularly evaluates its policies and practices and revises them as necessary.

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan College subscribes to the Community College League of California's policy update service. The league forwards policy change updates to the college on a regular basis. The college reviews the updates and adopts changes as appropriate.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. The Board has established policies that are broad in scope and has delegated the responsibility of developing administrative guidelines to the superintendent/president. The Board policies have been reviewed and revised as needed. Revisions have been made to keep the policies in conformity with new changes in Title 5 regulations or to reflect changes needed in Gavilan College's practices, e.g., budget development policy. The Board selected the Community College League of California policy development services to identify sample policies to aid Gavilan College in the total revision and updating of all policies.

At the Board retreat of November 2005, the Board developed goals and approved them on December 13, 2005. The goals for calendar year 2006 are included in the final budget along with the Strategic Plan goals to illustrate how the Board goals and the Strategic Plan goals are used to allocate resources.

Revisions to Board of Trustees policies are made on a regular basis. The latest series of changes were made during October 2005. Many of the changes in policy are the result of changes in laws either in the California Education Code or the California Government Code. The Board has several active Board subcommittees to facilitate their work. The Policy Subcommittee has been charged with monitoring the systematic review of the policies and presenting recommendations to the full Board (4.39).

Prior to approval by the Board of Trustees, President's Council reviews all changes and comments as appropriate. Board policies are reviewed twice prior to approval by the Board. In one month the proposed changes are placed on the agenda as an information item. The second time the item appears for action by the Board. The public has two opportunities to comment on proposed changes prior to approval by the Board.

PLAN:

None


  1. The Governing Board has a program for Board development and new member orientation. It has a mechanism for providing for continuity of Board membership and staggered terms of office.

DESCRIPTION:

The superintendent/president provides new members with an initial orientation. The Community College League of California offers a new trustee orientation that Board members are encouraged to attend and conferences for professional development. There is a written Board member orientation guide that is used by the administration to ensure each new Board member receives a comprehensive overview of the operations of the College. Board Policy 2010 (4.36) identifies the information covered during the initial orientation.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. Trustee Kent Child was appointed to the Board of Trustees and is the newest member of the Board. Trustee Child received an orientation as outlined in the Board policy and also attended the new trustee workshop presented by the Community College League of California. Other Board members were invited to the new member orientation so that they could receive a refresher on some of the operations of the college. The student trustee has been afforded the same opportunity.

PLAN:

None


  1. The Governing Board's self-evaluation processes for assessing Board performance are clearly defined, implemented, and published in its policies or bylaws.

DESCRIPTION:

Board Policy 2745 (4.40) requires the Board to conduct a self-evaluation on an annual basis. The process begins with a review of a questionnaire by the Self-Evaluation Subcommittee. Once the subcommittee agrees on the questionnaire that will be used it is sent to each member of the Board including the Student Trustee. Completed evaluations are returned to the superintendent/president's office to compile the results for distribution to the members of the Board. In late November or early December, the Board of Trustees holds a special meeting to review its performance and to establish goals for the upcoming year.

As result of the self-evaluation process, it is common that areas of weakness or concern mentioned in the self-evaluation questionnaire are then incorporated into the goals for the following year. This allows the Board to concentrate its efforts on improvement of concerns or trends noted by the Board.

The Board participates in retreat meetings and other special meetings to assist the Board in self-evaluation of performance and progress. The Board adopted a self-evaluation process in 1999 and has used that process since then. In accordance with Board Policy 2745 (4.40), a Board retreat is scheduled each year before December to implement and complete the self-evaluation. The evaluation is used to establish goals for the upcoming calendar year.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. Current policies of the Board require regular review and evaluation of the performance of the Board. Changes are made to goals for the upcoming year to reflect concerns noted in the self evaluation. The self-evaluation has proved to be very effective in ensuring that the Board remains focused on the global issues affecting the college and the importance of policy matters.

PLAN:

None


  1. The Governing Board has a code of ethics that includes a clearly defined policy for dealing with behavior that violates its code.

DESCRIPTION:

Code of Ethics/Standards of Practice and Conflict of Interest statements are included in Board Policies 2715 (4.41) and 2710 (4.42) and various government code sections. The policy identifies that the following actions are available to the Board:  Board Policy 2710 approved by the Board of Trustees, June 12, 2001, and Administrative Procedures 2710 (4.43) updated October 2005.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. The college does not have any record or history of activity where any member of the Board of Trustees was considered by the Board to violate a provision of the code of conduct. The policy is in place and can be applied should the situation ever arise.

PLAN:

None


  1. The Governing Board is informed about and involved in the accreditation process.

DESCRIPTION:

On December 13, 2005 the Board of Trustees received an information briefing on the process that was planned for development of the self-study report. Throughout the preparation of the self study the Board was provided with information about the process and what was being identified as areas where additional efforts would be needed by the college. A member of the Board of Trustees was appointed to serve on the Accreditation Task Force.

Prior to completion of the self-study report the Board received a copy of the accreditation standards and a full briefing on the self-study process and importance of the evaluation team visit. Correspondence between Gavilan College and the Accreditation Commission was provided to the Board so that they were fully aware of previous recommendations and concerns noted by the Commission.

The Board approved a draft of this document and on November 14, 2006, approved this self-study document by a unanimous vote. (4.44)

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. The Board of Trustees has been involved in all aspects of the development of the self-study report.

PLAN:

None


  1. The Governing Board has the responsibility for selecting and evaluating the district/system chief administrator (most often known as the chancellor) in a multi-college district/system or the college chief administrator (most often known as the president) in the case of a single college. The Governing Board delegates full responsibility and authority to him/her to implement and administer Board policies without Board interference and holds him/her accountable for the operation of the district/system or college, respectively. In multi-college districts/systems, the Governing Board establishes a clearly defined policy for selecting and evaluating the presidents of the colleges.

DESCRIPTION:

The Board of Trustees appointed Dr. Steven Kinsella Superintendent/President in January 2003 after conducting a nationwide search. The process used to select a new chief executive officer is identified in Board Policy 2431 (4.32). This process was used when Dr. Kinsella was hired. The hiring process was open and participatory and in accordance with policy under the direction of the Board of Trustees with assistance from a consulting firm. Board Policy 2431 (4.32) CEO Selection outlines the process that is followed when hiring a new CEO. The process was approved in October 2005 and closely matches the process that was used when Dr. Kinsella was hired.

Board Policy 2430 (4.45) provides for the delegation of authority to the superintendent/president for the on-going operations of the college. In summary, the authority delegated to the president is as follows:

"The Board delegates to the president of the college the executive responsibility for administering the policies adopted by the Board and executing all decisions of the Board requiring administrative action."

At least semiannually the superintendent/president and Board of Trustees meet to discuss progress on goals and the performance of the president. The mid-year review is an update of activities and status report on goals. Adjustments to goals are made as appropriate if operational situations warrant changes. At year end a performance evaluation is completed by the Board and presented to the superintendent/president.

Every two years the superintendent/president receives a comprehensive review that includes in-depth interviews of employees by members of the Board of Trustees. The process is described in Board Policy 2435 (4.46).

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. In keeping with Board Policy 2435 (4.46), the Board evaluated the superintendent/president on April 26, 2005, and solicited feedback from constituent groups regarding performance.

PLAN:

None


  1. The president has primary responsibility for the quality of the institution he/she leads. He/she provides effective leadership in planning, organizing, budgeting, selecting and developing personnel, and assessing institutional effectiveness.

  1. The president plans, oversees, and evaluates an administrative structure  organized and staffed to reflect the institution's purposes, size, and  complexity. He/she delegates authority to administrators and others consistent  with their responsibilities, as appropriate.

DESCRIPTION:

In January 2004, the superintendent/president initiated a reorganization proposal in response to state budget reductions. The president appointed the Budget Reduction Task Force, composed of representatives from all campus constituent groups, to make recommendations on reducing expenditures. This resulted in an administrative reorganization, a reduction in faculty and staff through attrition, and a curbing of services such as evening library hours. In fiscal year 06/07, the reorganization was reversed with one exception. The three vice president structure was restored and the dean of student services position has so far been left vacant.

Before arriving at the final structure for the reorganization of the administration, there was an eight-month period of time when the college community was afforded the opportunity to comment. Comments received had a significant influence on the final reporting relationships. The net result of the reorganization was that the college would have two vice presidents after reorganization, whereas prior to the reorganization there had been three vice presidents. In fall 2006, the college returned to a three vice president structure.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. The existing administrative structure provides adequate oversight of the college's educational, student support, and administrative services activities. As in any small college, administrators have to have a strong command of the operational details of how processes and systems operate. Administrators are technically proficient in their assigned areas of responsibility and also serve as important members of the leadership of the institution.

PLAN:

None


  1. The president guides institutional improvement of the teaching and learning environment by the following:
    • establishing a collegial process that sets values, goals, and priorities;
    • ensuring that evaluation and planning rely on high quality research and analysis on external and internal conditions;
    • ensuring that educational planning is integrated with resource planning and distribution to achieve student learning outcomes; and
    • establishing procedures to evaluate overall institutional planning and implementation effort

DESCRIPTION:

Gavilan College uses the President's Council as the main participatory governance structure to ensure all constituency groups are able to influence the values, goals, and priorities of the college. The Strategic Planning Committee is directly involved in formulating the goals, values, and priorities for the college. This committee meets on a quarterly basis to review progress on achieving Strategic Plan priorities and in setting new priorities as appropriate. The Strategic Plan Committee is a relatively new committee at the college having been established in 2005 for the purpose of involving more personnel in the planning aspects of the college on a continuous basis. Prior to this, a number of other processes and activities were occurring with a comprehensive Strategic Plan being developed as the end product of those efforts.

The college relies on research information and data from various sources in formulating its goals and priorities. For example, the enrollment analysis study conducted by Spencer Hoskins and Associates in September 2004 was subsequently researched further by Gavilan's Director of Institutional Research in cooperation with the State Chancellor's Office. The data was used to develop strategies to recruit more local students and establish full college campuses in two off-site locations within the district (4.47).

A second example was the College of Choice Task Force. This task force was created to bring representatives from the constituency groups together to develop ideas and strategies to attract more students to Gavilan College and to enhance the image of the college within the community. The College of Choice Task Force presented a number of recommendations with the most significant recommendations being: 1) hire more full-time faculty, 2) go through with the process to convert from an 18-week to a 16-week calendar, and 3) increase marketing efforts. These three recommendations have all been implemented (4.3).

Relevant and accurate data is routinely reported in enrollment reports, student profile reports, and reports that provide information on retention, success and transfer of students, to the extent that information is available. The college gathers demographic information and closely follows changes in population and composition of the student body to assist in determining what programming changes if any, are needed.

The Educational Master Plan is a comprehensive review of internal strengths and weaknesses of the college and an assessment of the external environment in which the college operates. The Educational Master Plan sets the direction of the academic programs of the college and is used to assist in formulating the Facilities Master Plan, the Technology Plan, the Strategic Plan, and a Five-Year Full-Time Faculty Hiring Plan. The documents reference numerous sources of data which is a critical consideration when formulating strategic direction.

Student learning outcome data is not fully developed and has not as yet been available in sufficient detail to assist in establishing new strategic initiatives. In the future, student learning outcome data will be incorporated into development of planning processes.

The Strategic Plan along with Board of Trustees' goals and other initiatives identified outside the routine planning processes are presented in the tentative budget and final budget. The budgets identify the strategic priority and goals for each priority along with the resources that have been allocated in the budget to assist in achieving those goals.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. Gavilan College uses a collaborative collegial process that establishes a forum for dialogue to occur regarding setting of the values, goals, and priorities of the college. Each department creates a unit plan which provides the opportunity to identify what actions need to be taken in their respective areas to improve student learning, to improve or change delivery of instruction, and to improve or change the manner in which the college directs its resources to improve the learning and working environment.

The Strategic Planning Committee created the opportunity for on-going reviews and assessments of planning, impacts of executed plans, and options for any member of the college community to become involved in setting the priorities for the college. By linking the final budget resource allocations to each strategic priority the college is able to ensure resources are allocated in a manner that supports planning. Showing this linkage in the budget also allows constituency groups to see that the budget has in fact been developed from the Strategic Plan.

It is relatively easy to see how resource allocations have achieved the desired results in some areas. For example, the Five-Year Full-Time Faculty Hiring Plan identified that there would be three new full-time faculty hired in fiscal year 04/05 and three more hired in fiscal year 05/06. Funds were allocated for those positions and full-time faculty members have been hired in accordance with the plan. Other initiatives are harder to measure, such as efforts to optimize enrollment. While substantial funding may be allocated to attract more students, it is often difficult to establish a cause and effect relationship between process changes and results achieved. In fall 2006, following implementation of the recommendations of the College of Choice Task Force, enrollment grew almost ten percent, while enrollment at neighboring districts remained flat or declined. A survey was conducted during the semester to ascertain which, if any, of the initiatives were related to the enrollment increase. Results of this survey will be reported in spring 2007.

PLAN:

None


  1. The president assures the implementation of statutes, regulations, and Governing Board policies and assures that institutional practices are consistent with institutional mission and policies.

DESCRIPTION:

The president assures implementation of statutes, regulations, and Governing Board polices through review of items presented to the Board of Trustees for action. Administrative procedures have been developed to establish standard operating procedures that ensure existing laws, regulations, and Board policies are followed in the execution of transactions conducted by college personnel. The Board of Trustees approves all expenditure of funds, personnel actions, budgets, curriculum, and a wide range of other activities that reflect obligations or commitments of the college. Internal processes such as the collaborative participatory governance processes are described in administrative procedures or Board policies. Board policies and administrative procedures are updated regularly through the use of the Community College League of California's Board policy update service.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard.

PLAN:

None.


  1. The president effectively controls budget and expenditures.

DESCRIPTION:

The president follows a budget development process that is approved by the Academic Senate and is fairly consistent with other California community colleges. A budget calendar is approved by the Board of Trustees around December/January prior to the start of a fiscal year. All revenue and expenditure assumptions are reviewed and compared to information presented by the State Chancellor's Office. Prior year actual expenditures are presented in budget documents to allow the president and other users the ability to determine if expenditure and revenue assumptions are reasonable given past performance.

During the course of the year, a mid-year review is conducted and presented to the Board of Trustees for information. During the course of the year, changes in the budget are presented to the Board for approval. Through the mid-year review and monthly adjustments to the budget, the president is able to monitor the financial performance of the college.

In addition to the individual controls applied by the president, the College Budget Committee and the Board of Trustees Budget Committee review all proposed changes to the budget as well as actual versus budget information over the course of the year.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard. The procedures used by Gavilan College and the president to develop the budget and monitor it throughout the year have been effective in ensuring that the college generated surpluses in the past three fiscal years. This has occurred in spite of unexpected decreases in revenues and increases in costs necessary to achieve desired enrollment levels. Overall the financial performance of the college has been stable, thereby allowing planning initiatives to proceed as scheduled.

PLAN:

None 


  1. The president works and communicates effectively with the communities served by the institution.

DESCRIPTION:

The president is involved in a number of community organizations and has maintained relationships with the superintendents of the nearby high schools. The college presents an annual report to the community to highlight facts and activities of the college and to inform community members about services available from Gavilan. The president is heavily involved in community functions. He is a member of the Board of Directors of the Morgan Hill Chamber of Commerce, is a member of the Gilroy Rotary and led efforts to establish a community visioning process in San Benito County. The president represents the college at major community events and activities.

The college presents timely information to local newspapers about newsworthy items occurring on campus and responds to comments by the press as appropriate. Information received from community organizations is used to consider what additional programming options may be needed to meet community needs.

EVALUATION:

The college meets this standard.

PLAN:

None


  1. In multi-college districts or systems, the district/system provides primary leadership in setting and communicating expectations of educational excellence and integrity throughout the district/system and assures support for the effective operation of the colleges. It establishes clearly defined roles of authority and responsibility between the colleges and the district/system and acts as the liaison between the colleges and the Governing Board.
  1. The district/system clearly delineates and communicates the operational responsibilities and functions of the district/system from those of the colleges and consistently adheres to this delineation in practice.
  2. The district/system provides effective services that support the colleges in their missions and functions.
  3. The district/system provides fair distribution of resources that are adequate to support the effective operations of the colleges.
  4. The district/system effectively controls its expenditures.
  5. The chancellor gives full responsibility and authority to the presidents of the colleges to implement and administer delegated district/system policies without his/her interference and holds them accountable for the operation of the colleges.
  6. The district/system acts as the liaison between the colleges and the Governing Board. The district/system and the colleges use effective methods of communication, and they exchange information in a timely manner.
  7. The district/system regularly evaluates district/system role delineation and governance and decision-making structures and processes to assure their integrity and effectiveness in assisting the colleges in meeting educational goals. The district/system widely communicates the results of these evaluations and uses them as the basis for improvement.

This section is not applicable as Gavilan is a single college district.

Last modified: February 4, 2007
Gavilan College Red Diamond 5055 Santa Teresa Boulevard Red Diamond Gilroy, CA 95020 Red Diamond (408) 848-4800